The Eternal Journey

The Eternal Journey

Movie Review : Krishnam Vande Jagadgurum




Two movies of a different genre, Gamyam and Vedam, and Krish surprises everyone this time with an Action Entertainer, Krishnam Vande Jagdgurum. Shot in the backdrop of the dusty mining zone of Bellary, this is the story of a ‘Surabhi’ artiste and a press reporter encountering a mining big-shot. B.Tech Babu (Rana Daggubati) is a part of a ‘Surabhi’ troop, but never likes being a part of it. His grandfather Surabhi Subrahmanyam (Kota Srinivasa Rao) on the contrary believes that art (drama) is everything. He dies leaving behind a script titled ‘Krishnam Vande Jagadgurum’ to be performed on the Bellary stage only by Babu. Devika is a journalist under a sting operation to unleash the mining scams in the Bellary district. Babu and Devika cross paths and it ends up in Babu locking horns with Reddappa (Milind Gunaji), the Mining don. What happens thereafter is the rest of the story.

Points of Differentiation of KVJ:

Out of the myriad good things in the movie, I’d rate the following in the same order as my top 3 superlatives in the movie.

1.   Re-recording & background score: Manisharma seems to have regained his fading glory with a splendid job on the re-recording. The theme music runs throughout the movie and haunts you even off the screen.

2.  Story, Screenplay: Yes. Just the story & screenplay. You would expect good quality direction from a director of Krish’s standards. However, like his earlier two films, story and screenplay are the differentiating factors in this film too. Despite being a action entertainer, Krish made it different with an interesting story and a gripping screenplay. The flashback episode and the pre-climax are the biggest assets of the movie. In fact, those are the Turning points.

3.   Protagonist’s characterization: You will see a ‘never-seen-before’ Rana in this film. The titles should have said ‘Rana – Reloaded’. He was terrific in the character of B.Tech Babu and carried the role with élan. In the opening scene, you would be cursing yourself seeing Rana mess up the Abhimanyu character, however, it is justified immediately by Kota chastising him and he replies saying ‘akkadunna audience ki ee maatram chaala ekkuva’ (meaning; for the audience here, this level of acting itself is more than enough)

      He was stupendous in the action sequences. After Prabhas and Gopichand, it is Rana who can  convincingly, with his physique, bash-up goons all around. The keynote script performed in the pre-climax is a treat to watch.

Points of Parity of KVJ:

1.    Nayanatara lived the role of Devika. She appeared at ease with herself. Brahmanandam (as Rangasthala Pandit), Hema and Raghu Babu were adequate to tickle your ribs.

2.  The title track, finds its ancestral home (read: INSPIRED) in Inception and Chatrapathi. However, the finer variations with the violin make this track worth a REPEAT on your playlist.

Turn-Offs in KVJ:

1.    Krish somehow got lost in the routine 6-song format of the Telugu films. Two of the songs were really not necessary in the movie. The item song’ in the 2nd half could have been done away with, thereby elevating the impact of the pre-climax. Spicy Spicy girl could also have been done away with, however, the hip-hop tuning and the picturization compensate for it.

KVJ is one movie that makes us realize that we have a right to utilize and leverage nature, but not exploit it; and it is our primary duty to ensure to preserve nature as-is and hand it over to the next generation. We have no right to exploit nature and deprive the future generations from their very basic right of living. This has been portrayed through the character of Matti Raju (L B Sreeram).

It also teaches us that there is always a gap in the ideologies of two successive generations (the scenes in the forest). No generation is wrong in what they say, however, if we just listen with an open heart, we will find answers to all the confusions. The elder generation is right in their context, and the younger generation is also right in their context. The onus is hence, on the younger generations to blend the past experience of the elders with the realities of the present, and apply a little of the uncommonly used common sense, and BINGO. There you are.

On the whole, KVJ is a real good movie and is a must watch with the entire family.

My Rating: 3.5 out of 5. (I’d have added another 0.5 had those two songs been edited out in the movie). 
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